Human tissues and apple? Do those two go hand and hand? One researcher’s objective was to study the behavior of cells while the physical surroundings changed. This method was tested successfully on lab mice by injecting the cellulose scaffolding under its skin. While this is still in the developmental stage, it has yet to be tested on humans.

 

Adding a page to the book of regenerative medicine that is all about treating body parts and repair of tissues with engineered alternatives, scientists at the University of Ottawa have demonstrated that human tissues can be grown on apples.

 

In technical terms, this type of tissue development is known as biohacking. Andrew Pelling, who is heading the Pelling Laboratory at Ottawa University’s Laboratory for Biophysical Manipulation, has been spearheading research to go beyond the possibilities of genetic and chemical manipulation of cells.

 

Pelling’s objective was to study the behavior of cells when physical surroundings change. The method was successfully tested on lab mice by injecting the cellulose scaffolding under its skin. Currently, it is in the developmental stage, and the method is yet to be used in human beings.

 

The new strides in biohacking are demonstrated at Pelling’s lab, where an ear enclosed in a dish on a sheet-metal is on display. It could be mistaken for a human ear, but in reality, it is an apple carved in the shape of an ear.

 

The study has been published in PLOS One. Continue on to see how this study is having an impact on the world of regenerative medicine: