Follow Us:
< back

Share

Robots wearing 3D Bioprinted Skin? Yup. You heard that right.

Image for Robots wearing 3D Bioprinted Skin? Yup. You heard that right.

Alright alright we admit this does sound pretty creepy, 3D Bioprinted skin on a robot sounds like something out of a scifi movie. According to scientist at Oxford University, this looks like the future for robots. No more metal creatures out of Star Wars with lights flashing. Robots will eventually absolutely look like humans. It’s hard to say now how much can be done with 3D Bioprinting at the moment, but we definitely believe there is a bright future.

 

Right now, you have to grow human transplants in a stationary environment. That’s more than a little dangerous when they could buckle under the stresses of a real body. Oxford University may have a clever (if slightly ghastly) solution to that problem: have robots wear the tissue first. If you grow muscles on humanoid robots, the movement and overall shape of those machines would lead to grafts and transplants that are ready for serious strain.

 

Naturally, this robotic conditioning would be most useful for higher-quality transplants. You could even personalize transplants by modifying the robot to reflect a patient’s anatomy. However, the Oxford team sees other uses. It could reduce the use of animal testing in pre-clinical trials, and could even represent a step toward “biohybrid humanoids” that combine real tissue with mechanical systems. We’re not so sure people are looking forward to that last part (it sounds like the background for a Terminator movie), but the discovery is great news overall for burn victims and others who need transplants. Instead of waiting weeks for replacements to grow on their own bodies, they could have doctors print transplants that get a robotic shakedown in a much shorter time.

 

The capabilities of 3D Bioprinting are endless. Read this article below to see the possibilities behind the future of robots using 3D Bioprinting.

Read full story

More News:

Corneal transplantation is one of the primary treatments for loss of corneal function, but only one in 70 people who need corneal transplants receive them, leaving some 12.5 million people suffering from vision loss because there simply aren’t enough corneal donors to go around. Attempts to replicate the perfectly-spherical, collagen-based protective layer of the eye...

Read more

Name: Brian Bolarinho Location: Boston, MA Position: Support / Applications Engineering Intern Hello to anyone who is reading this. My name is Brian, and I am the support and applications engineering intern at CELLINK for the Spring 2019 season. I am currently working towards a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering at Wentworth Institute of Technology....

Read more

Scientists at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) have created a 3D-bioprinted BioMask that could treat facial wounds or burns with tissue regenerated from the mask. The BioMask was developed using a customized, bioengineered skin substitute in combination with a wound dressing layer that can snugly fit onto a facial wound to regenerate skin,...

Read more