Plenty of research has been completed regarding the different materials we use to create biomedical parts. Many innovative bioinks – biomaterials loaded with cells to 3D print biological structures – have been developed for 3D bioprinting purposes, from materials like stem cellsgelatin hydrogels, and even sugarcane waste. 3D bioprinting itself is changing the field of medicine as we know it, because we can now fabricate patient-specific human tissues in a laboratory setting.

However, this technology only works if researchers and doctors have good bioinks on hand…and how do we know the materials are good? It’s expensive, difficult, and can take a long time to evaluate if these bioinks are 3D printable. That’s why many many researchers, like a team from the Wallenberg Wood Science Center (WWSC) in Sweden are starting to rely more and more on computer simulations to optimize these biomaterials.